Nov 7
2011

Creamy & Low-Fat Mashed Potatoes Recipe

Creamy-&-Low-Fat-Mashed-Potatoes-Recipe-Cookin-Canuck

To say my husband was skeptical about a low-fat, healthy mashed potato recipe would be an understatement. And really, who can blame him? After all, the Thanksgiving feast is traditionally all about butter and cream. Don’t get me wrong, I love buttery, rich dishes as much as the next Pilgrim. However, I am also determined to make it out the other side of the holiday without popping the seams of my favorite jeans. Perhaps more faulty reasoning would be that I can eat more pumpkin pie and pour on extra gravy if the mashed potatoes don’t contain a weekend’s worth of saturated fat. (By the way, be sure to head to How to Make Turkey Gravy: Recipe & Troubleshooting for some helpful tips.)

So, how do you achieve creamy, tantalizing mashed potatoes with only a modicum of fat? The first step is to cut the potatoes into cubes. Not only will they cook faster, but they will be the perfect size for the next step. Once cooked, drained and quickly dried in the pot, the potatoes are ready for the food mill. My trusty OXO food mill does the trick every time (really, is there anything this company doesn’t make well?) but a potato ricer is a great substitute. If you don’t have either of these kitchen tools, don’t fret. You can also use a hand-mixer. The potatoes won’t be quite as a lump-free, but very close.

The potatoes are whipped right into a mixture of skim milk, 1 tablespoon (!) of butter and seasonings. I know, I know – sounds like a pathetic mixture, right? Au contraire, my spud-loving friends. My husband was very surprised and impressed at the texture and taste of these potatoes and gave me a very enthusiastic nod of approval. Coming from a man who makes a gigantic volcano of mashed potatoes, filled with a crater full of gravy, that’s saying something.

The recipe:
Place cubed potatoes in a large saucepan and cover potatoes with cold water. Add 1 teaspoon kosher salt and set saucepan over high heat. Bring to a boil and cook until potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork, about 15 minutes.

LowFatMashedPotatoes1

Drain potatoes, return to saucepan and set over medium heat, stirring the potatoes until dry, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and cover to keep potatoes warm.

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine milk, butter, remaining salt and freshly ground black pepper. Stir occasionally until butter is melted. Reduce heat to low.

LowFatMashedPotatoes2

Rest a food mill, fitted with the medium disc, on top of the saucepan with the milk mixture.

Working with about one-third of the potatoes at a time, run the potatoes through the food mill, directly into the saucepan. Alternatively, use a potato ricer.

If you don’t have a food mill or potato ricer, a hand-held mixer can also be used.

Low-Fat Mashed Potatoes Collage

Using a rubber spatula (a heatproof one, please) stir the potatoes into the milk mixture until completely combined. Be sure to taste the mashed potatoes and adjust the seasonings, if necessary. Serve.

LowFatMashedPotatoes6

Other holiday-worthy potato recipes:
Cookin’ Canuck’s Twice-Baked Sweet Potato with Chipotle Pecan Streusel
Cookin’ Canuck’s Scalloped Potatoes with Gorgonzola, Parmesan & Cheddar Cheeses
The Kitchn’s Sweet Potato Gratin with Caramelized Onions
Joy the Baker’s Hasselback Potatoes with Spinach Cashew Pesto
Baking BItes’ Brown Sugar Cardamom Sweet Potato Pie

Creamy & Low-Fat Mashed Potatoes

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Yield: Serves 6

Serving Size: 1/2 cup

Calories per serving: 137 cal

Fat per serving: Total Fat 1.9g / Saturated Fat 1.2g

Calories 136.9 / Total Fat 1.9g / Saturated Fat 1.2g / Cholesterol 5.7mg / Sodium 399.3mg / Total Carbohydrates 27.5g / Fiber 2.0g / Sugars 2.4g / Protein 4.0g / WW (Old Points) 2 / WW (Points+) 4

Ingredients

  • 2 lb. russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 3/4-inch cubes
  • 1 1/2 tsp kosher salt, divided
  • 2/3 cup non-fat or low-fat (1%) milk
  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Place cubed potatoes in a large saucepan and cover potatoes with cold water. Add 1 teaspoon kosher salt and set saucepan over high heat.
  2. Bring to a boil and cook until potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork, about 15 minutes.
  3. Drain potatoes, return to saucepan and set over medium heat, stirring the potatoes until dry, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and cover to keep potatoes warm.
  4. In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine milk, butter, remaining salt and freshly ground black pepper. Stir occasionally until butter is melted.
  5. Reduce heat to low.
  6. Rest a food mill, fitted with the medium disc, on top of the saucepan with the milk mixture.
  7. Working with about one-third of the potatoes at a time, run the potatoes through the food mill, directly into the saucepan. Alternatively, use a potato ricer.
  8. Using a rubber spatula (a heatproof one, please) stir the potatoes into the milk mixture until completely combined. Be sure to taste the mashed potatoes and adjust the seasonings, if necessary. Serve.

Notes

From the kitchen of Cookin Canuck | www.cookincanuck.com Adapted from Gourmet Magazine

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{ 49 comments… read them below or add one }

1 bellini November 7, 2011 at 7:08 am

A Thanksgiving dinner is not complete without creamy mashed potatoes to soak up all of the gravy.

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2 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 9:09 am

I agree. Really, the mashed potatoes are just a vessel for a large pool of gravy.

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3 Belinda @zomppa November 7, 2011 at 7:21 am

Gotta love the buttah…but also love that this gives you more space for more! =) Love it – looks sooooooo creamy!!

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4 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 9:09 am

Thanks, Belinda. We were so surprised at how smooth and creamy these were.

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5 Sommer@ASpicyPerspective November 7, 2011 at 7:32 am

Those husbands… haven’t they figured out we are always right, yet? ;)

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6 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 9:09 am

Ha! I’ll tell my husband you said so.

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7 Bev Weidner November 7, 2011 at 8:30 am

MEN.

And I need to inhale this.

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8 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 9:10 am

Thanks, Bev. Luckily, I have a husband who’s pretty darn reasonable at the end of the day.

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9 SweetSugarBelle November 7, 2011 at 9:53 am

Moderate where you can! I like it!

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10 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 2:28 pm

That’s my motto, too. It makes the holiday more enjoyable if I’m not in a food coma!

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11 Chris @ TheKeenanCookBook November 7, 2011 at 11:06 am

I think the same way as you – if I cut out the butter in my other dishes, that means I can eat extra dessert! Love that this only calls for 1(!) tbsp of butter

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12 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 2:29 pm

Thanks, Chris. I was amazed that the potatoes were still so creamy, even without extra butter.

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13 Curt November 7, 2011 at 11:33 am

I’m all for healthier mashed potatoes. I like the addition of the sea salt as your mixing them. we always add salt later, Your way makes more sense.

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14 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 2:30 pm

Thanks, Curt. Adding later probably works just as well if you’re uncertain about how much will appeal to your taste buds.

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15 Lydia (The Perfect Pantry) November 7, 2011 at 1:30 pm

Great method! I hate to leave out mashed potatoes, or mashed sweet potatoes, but I’m not averse to a little behind-the-scenes lightening up of the recipes. I feel sneaky, but in a good way.

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16 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 2:30 pm

Very true, Lydia. Nobody ever needs to know.

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17 Kristina @ spabettie November 7, 2011 at 1:37 pm

great technique – I always look forward to mashed potatoes at the holidays… low fat means I can eat even more!

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18 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 2:30 pm

Kristina, I like the way you think.

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19 Kiran @ KiranTarun.com November 7, 2011 at 2:02 pm

That is one creamy and delicious looking mashed potatoes – love that it’s low fat :)

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20 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 2:31 pm

Thanks, Kiran. We are really happy to have a healthier option.

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21 Barbara | Creative Culinary November 7, 2011 at 2:04 pm

I admit; I like my mashed potatoes with more butter BUT I also love trying ways to cut it too. I will add some low fat Greek yogurt and/or herbs or garlic to up the flavor a bit without the butter. I like smashed potatoes; my daughter likes mashed; we both need less butter so great recommendation.

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22 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 2:31 pm

Barb, believe me, I love butter as much as the next gal. However, in a day filled with so many butter-laden dishes, it’s nice to have an option to go a little lighter.

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23 Alison @ Ingredients, Inc. November 7, 2011 at 2:07 pm

would love to dive into these!

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24 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 7, 2011 at 2:32 pm

Thanks, Alison. They were a hit with the mashed potato lovers in my house.

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25 Cassie @ Bake Your Day November 7, 2011 at 2:54 pm

I don’t attempt low-fat mashed potatoes…my husband can smell them. His mom uses cream cheese and sour cream in hers. I have no chance at making healthier ones for him! These sound wonderful!

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26 Maria November 7, 2011 at 3:06 pm

You can’t have Thanksgiving without mashed potatoes, these look perfect!

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27 Krista {Budget Gourmet Mom} November 7, 2011 at 3:07 pm

We usually fatten up our Thanksgiving taters with whole milk but throughout the year I usually use skim milk. They turn out so good! Perhaps this Thanksgiving I will opt to serve the usual lighter version. Gotta leave room for pie!

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28 Lana @ Never Enough Thyme November 7, 2011 at 3:29 pm

Great option for mashed potatoes, Dara! Funny that they’ve never been part of our holiday meal. Sweet potatoes in every imaginable way, yes, but regular mashed potatoes, no.

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29 Katrina November 7, 2011 at 4:09 pm

These sound delicious! I could just eat this for lunch!

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30 Katrina November 7, 2011 at 5:23 pm

While I will admit I do love a cream-laden, butter-filled mashed potato, I agree with you 100%. I pretty much never make the full fat kind, just as you said, to save room for other more important calories! Great post!

Katrina, Baking and Boys! Funny, but I noticed whenever I comment on your blog I’m always right after another Katrina! ;)

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31 carolinaheartstrings November 7, 2011 at 5:35 pm

Thanks for sharing such a yummy looking recipe just in time for the holidays. Cannot wait to try. Come over and visit. We have a wonderful pumpkin cheesecake today.

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32 Sylvie @ Gourmande in the Kitchen November 7, 2011 at 6:31 pm

I have that some food mill and I love it too!

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33 Adventuresindinner November 7, 2011 at 7:26 pm

Love my food mill too. So glad to have found your blog, happy new follower. Hope you come and check out my piece of blogland.

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34 Jeanette November 7, 2011 at 8:57 pm

What a great way to lighten up mashed potatoes, just in time for the holidays. I use a a ricer for my mashed potatoes and love the texture it provides.

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35 Deborah November 7, 2011 at 10:15 pm

I’ve wanted a food mill, but now I think I have a reason to buy one!

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36 naomi November 7, 2011 at 10:58 pm

Okay, this is something I must make. I love mash potatoes and could eat it as a meal, so a low-fat version would be really helpful!

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37 kelley November 8, 2011 at 7:10 am

I too was skeptical when I read the title. I didn’t think low-fat anything tasted good but even I have to admit that they look fluffy and like I’d have no problem eat a good size portion! With extra gravy of course………

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38 Cookbook Queen November 8, 2011 at 7:49 am

Such a great idea, I actually even have a potato ricer!!

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39 Magic of Spice November 8, 2011 at 10:07 am

I so have to check into that food mill…these do look perfectly creamy :)

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40 Nutmeg Nanny November 8, 2011 at 12:30 pm

These mashed potatoes look heavenly! The fact that they are low fat makes them even better :)

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41 Elle November 9, 2011 at 7:09 am

I could eat mashed potatoes every single day. If I did do that, they’d definitely have to be low fat like these!

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42 Kita November 9, 2011 at 8:47 am

I love mashed potatoes (duh, who doesn’t?) but Ill admit, I often don’t make them at home because of the amount of butter or cream we normally throw in them to make them amazing. This whipped pile of ‘spud-loving’ awesomeness sounds amazing!

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43 Jen at The Three Little Piglets November 9, 2011 at 6:53 pm

Using a food mill makes a huge difference! You can get away with so much less cream and butter, or cream cheese, or whatever because the potatoes are so light and fluffy.

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44 Nichol November 10, 2011 at 5:26 am

I need to invest in a potato ricer. I went to England years ago and they used them all the time. The potatoes were deliciously creamy every single time. I do mine similar to you, however I add a bit of sour cream:)

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45 Marla November 11, 2011 at 8:37 pm

Great tips..interesting about the cubes. I have found that a little bit of butter goes a long way. My taste buds don’t need much of it for BIG rewards.

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46 Eel December 27, 2011 at 7:27 am

Your’s is the intlielegnt approach to this issue.

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47 nvpggp December 29, 2011 at 2:25 am
48 Rosanne November 10, 2013 at 2:08 pm

How do these reheat? Iusually like to do most of my prepping and or cooking before company arrives so I don’t have a messy kitchen.

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49 Dara (Cookin' Canuck) November 11, 2013 at 11:05 am

Rosanne, I reheated this last year, just adding a touch more milk for moisture, and they worked out perfectly.

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